Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Very Hungry Caterpillar Step Book


Step Book written directions (web and pdf)

Step Book youtube tutorial

June 25th is Eric Carle's eightieth birthday and The Very Hungry Caterpillar turns 40 this year. To celebrate, June's project is a Hungry Caterpillar Step Book.

I made the book from 4 pieces of paper (US Letter or A4 paper cut in half the short way). It has 6 steps (Monday through Saturday) plus a extra layer for the title and butterfly page. It is easiest to make a three-step book and then line the fourth piece up with the first small step and fold it around the back. Children can write their own words or you can print out the words here.

Page by page pictures of this book are on Flickr.

BOOKS AND LINKS

Eric Carle's classic book which turns forty this year.

The Official Eric Carle Website
This wonderful website includes a photo and video gallery and Eric Carle's blog among other offerings.

Eric Carle talks about The Very Hungry Caterpillar
In this youtube video produced by Waterstone's bookstore for the fortieth anniversary of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle talks about its creation.

The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
The website of Eric Carle's Museum in Amherst, MA. There are lots of events planned for this birthday/anniversary year as well as exhibits by other children's book illustrators.

4 comments:

learningparade said...

Hello Susan,
I just stumbled upon your blog today and I wanted to let you know how fantastic I think your ideas are! This mini book is so clever, I will give it a try next year :) Thanks for sharing.

NZBookgirl said...

I always wonder what the copyright issues are in creating a book like this - where the content is directly taken from a published book. Would love to hear your take on this.

Susan Kapuscinski Gaylord said...

NZBookgirl

I thought about this before I did the project. The main reasons I chose to go ahead were that I believe that it is something that will promote interest in and perhaps purchases of the book and I am not making any money from it. I looked around online and there are a lot of educational projects based on children's books. This is obviously based more on my vision of intent than on the specific law so I wouldn't use my thinking as a guide. It's always a difficult question. I am reading books by Lawrence Lessig who has a lot to say about copyright and creativity and society.

Susan Kapuscinski Gaylord said...

One more thing about the copyright question:
I had no qualms about making the book itself, but did question whether it was appropriate to share the pdf of text that I created for my sample. I decided to go ahead since the use was noncommercial and educational. Again, I am not a lawyer. This is my interpretation.